Diabetes and Depression



What about diabetes and depression? What are the causes of diabetic depression? Are there any signs of depression? How does the doctor treat depression?

I was fortunate after I was diagnosed with diabetes. I had many things I was working on. That kept my mind from dwelling on what I had lost or how diabetes would affect my life. There are many diabetics who are having problems with depression, due to their deteriorating health.

The disease itself, can make you depressed, as the high glucose and insulin levels deplete your serotonin. This depletion of our feel good hormone may give us feelings of depression, anxiety, and despair. A type 2 diabetics insulin resistance, starves our cells for energy. Under stress, the insulin resistant diabetic will get fatigued. The stress releases a hormone called cortisone, triggering the fight or flight response.

In other words, a diabetics emotions may be all over the place. This is a time that the diabetic needs his families support to get them through the rough times. My wife was a big help in keeping my spirits up the first weeks after my diabetes was diagnosed.

For a newly diagnosed diabetic, this may be a really rough time, as they may be eating in a way to actually perpetuate this depressive cycle. The first thing to do is, get control of these mood swings. To do this, we’ll get your diet and nutritional needs met. This will control these emotional surges.

This is the point at which a diabetic needs hope. He needs to believe that, making the effort to change, is worth it. This is when a diabetic needs to know a few facts. Just keeping glucose numbers in a range with insulin or diabetic medication is not helping their recovery.

The medication is keeping you alive, long enough to, reverse the reasons you became diabetic. Unless you attack the causes of your diabetes the disease will continue to progress. Denying this fact will not change anything.

Getting your diabetes under control will end this depression, lower your risks of heart disease, and the other complications of diabetes.

It’s no surprise that many diabetics may be angry over their having gotten diabetes. The changes and problems you’re enduring may be maddening. Once you hear your doctor’s pronouncement that diabetes is incurable the whole situation can seem hopeless.

Depression is much higher in diabetics than in the general population. Your doctor’s response to your depression will likely be to prescribe you a drug like prozac in addition to all the other drugs you may be on by now. Changing your diet, exercising, and nutritional supplementation may sound complicated and expensive. Actually, once the costs of all the drugs is taken in consideration, the non medical route may end up cheaper.

What else can a diabetic do to lift his spirits?

Get involved in a diabetic support group. Meeting others who are dealing with the same problems will help you realize you’re not alone.

Get involved with a local church. Those who have something to live for, beyond themselves are happier and healthier.

Get out, walk, and get some sunshine every day. This helps keep you from developing a vitamin D deficiency. Keeping a good level of vitamin D, can help lift your spirits. Exercise helps raise your depleted serotonin levels.

Volunteer at a homeless shelter, salvation army, or a hospital auxiliary. Helping those who are worse off than you are, will help you to realize, you have plenty to live for.

Being around other people is much better than being alone. Do not set too tough of goals for yourself during this time. It may take a while to recover but the best thing about diabetes and depression is, it can be done.

Nutritional supplements for depression, include B vitamins, Vitamin C, Magnesium, St. Johns Wort, and Ginkgo biloba.

Now that you know more about diabetes and depression, please review our article on synthetic vitamins to be sure you are getting what you’re paying for. Another article that may be helpful is best foods for diabetics.

Leave Diabetes and Depression to Return to Diabetes Complications

Leave Diabetes and Depression and go to the Site Map